Information for prospective buyers:
We require a non-refundable $500 deposit to hold a baby for anyone. It does not matter what happens the $500 will not be refunded if you decide you cannot pick your baby up by the agreed upon time frame. The baby cannot be shipped. It must be picked up at Tag Along Ranch. If we have to keep the baby for you past the time he/she is ready we will charge an additional $20 per day which is what we have to pay the babysitter to feed the babies. All out of state buyers will require a health certificate to take the baby to their state. Please make sure primates are legal in your area. Health certificates are $50. each and we will obtain it prior to your arrival to pick up the baby. You are responsible for making sure all the states you are going through and your home state, city and county allow primates. It is devastating to take a baby home become attached to her/him then find out they are illegal. They can be seized and euthanized if the authorities so choose.

MARMOSETS REQUIRE A WARM MOIST ENVIRONMENT. THEIR AREA HAS TO BE KEPT NO LESS THAN 80 DEGREES AT ALL TIMES EVEN AS ADULTS
INFANTS SHOULD BE KEPT BETWEEN 85 AND 95 DEGREES AT ALL TIMES.

A new baby will consume a lot of your time and energy. Here is the feeding regime you can expect. When the baby is picked up I will demonstrate feeding and mixing of the formula and review all the instructions. You will also be expected to sign the USDA form.



MARMOSET FEEDING

0-6wks
Mix formula as directed on can. 1 scoop to 2 oz water. Mix 2 oz at a time. Formula is good for approx 5 days in the refrigerator. Please use bottled spring water. When you get it mixed put approx. ½ tsp of all natural plain yogurt in and stir well. Shake well before each use.
Take a small container and place a small amt of very hot water in it. Place small baby food jar with approx 2 mls formula in it into the warm water to warm the formula.
Take baby and wrap in a dry washcloth so it can be handled easier. Only leave baby’s head sticking out. Draw up formula into the eye dropper. Test the temp. on your wrist. It should be warm. Hold the eye dropper sideways and touch the tip to the baby’s mouth. Just to let baby get a taste. Do not touch baby’s mouth when it is screaming or peeping. Baby should start licking the formula. Be very patient and let baby get a taste. Keep eye dropper sideways so baby will not get squirted with the formula. Gradually let baby drink the formula until it is all gone. Get more into your dropper and do the same. If the baby stops licking take the dropper away from it's mouth. Offer it again until the baby stops completely.  Baby should eat every 3 hours during the day and every 3-4 hours at night. Should gradually increase the amt of formula during this time.

6wks-8wks
Start offering baby food fruits, vegetables and meats at 6 weeks of age. Offer 1 thing at a time and do not buy anything mixed. Also offer monkey biscuits soaked in juice. Place a small amt on your finger and allow baby to lick it off. Baby can continue to have formula after they are 12 weeks old and up to adulthood for bonding and nutrition. Place a water bottle in the cage as soon as the baby is getting around on his own.
This is a good blend once baby is eating on own: Mix in blender-
4 oz water
2 scoops formula
1tbsp #1 gerber sweet potatoes
1 ½  tsp. gerber baby rice cereal dry
1 ½  tsp. dry marmoset diet ( purchase online from primate store) it is like baby cereal.
Blend well and refrigerate.

Older feedings you can make up frozen dinners or fresh whichever is convienient for you.
Each morning:

Put food in the feed bowl. Place a tablespoon of Yogurt mixture(1 container plain non fat yogurt, 1 container flavored yogurt and ground monkey biscuits) on top with some sliced apples or unsweetened applesauce.

Foods marmosets like:
Fruits and vegetables
Mango
Oranges
Bananas
Melon
Grapes
Pinapple
Apples
Peaches
Pears
Raisins
Papaya

Vegetables:
Carrots
Green beans
Corn
Sweet potatoes
Cauliflower
Peas
Turnips

Protein:

Cheese
Boiled eggs
Boiled white meat chicken
Marmoset diet canned
Biscuits dry and soaked (they like them soaked in fruit juice)

Offer biscuits dry at all times in separate feed bowl.





BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Weight: 9 to 16 ounces
Head & Body: 9" to 12"
Tail: 11" to 16", non-prehensile
Lifespan: 10 to 18 years in captivity

REPRODUCTION

The gestation period for marmosets and tamarins is around 145 to 150 days. They usually give birth to twins, but they can have between 1 and 3 babies, each weighing in at around an ounce. The father and older brothers and sisters help take care of the infants by giving the mother a rest and carrying them around for a while. By 4 to 6 weeks, the babies take interest in solid foods and start sampling their parents' meals. By 2 1/2 to 3 months they are pretty self-sufficient and at about 4 months they stop riding around on their parents' backs. Males reach sexual maturity between 9 and 13 months, but females take a bit longer, between 18 and 24 months.

COMMUNICATION

Marmosets and tamarins communicate through a vocabulary of high pitched squeaks and chatters. They sound much like a bird chirping. They scent mark as a way of defining their territory. They have a variety of facial expressions which are much like humans and when upset or threatened, their hair stands on end.

GROUP STRUCTURE

In the wild, they live in extended family groups of up to 15 individuals. The group usually consists of one adult male and female and their offspring. Offspring that reach sexual maturity will stay with the group for a while, but generally do not breed. Marmosets and tamarins are very territorial and will chase off any neighboring groups. They spend most of their day grooming each other and foraging for food.



CAPTIVE CARE - HOUSING

According to Heather of Heathers Wild World, "Even though they are tiny creatures, they are very active and need a large cage. I house my tamarins in large walk-in indoor enclosures, measuring 7 ft. tall, 6 ft. wide, and 8 ft. deep. In the warm seasons, they also have access (via a tunnel) to an outdoor 12ft. wide x 8ft. deep x 15ft. tall enclosure.

Shelves, branches, and ropes provide needed diversity in their environment. It is important to us many widths and lengths so they learn to adapt to the variety in the stability of the different items. I have found that many ferret toys, such as hammocks, hanging houses, and tunnels, are great for marmosets and tamarins and are just the right size."

The humidity needs to remain around 50-75% and the temperature should be kept at around 80 degrees if they are kept by themselves. If they are housed indoors a full spectrum bulb, like a VITALITE, needs to be in place to help replace the much needed vitamin D3 from the sunlight that they are missing.

Make sure not to sterilize their entire cage at once. Leave some perches or commonly scented areas so they still feel at home. Then just rotate cleaning these spots when you wash the cage. If you keep them in an outdoor enclosure, make sure to provide plenty of foliage and hiding spots. In the wild, marmosets and tamarins are prey for birds and if they are too exposed, they may suffer from stress related problems.

CAPTIVE CARE - DIET

A varied and correct diet is very important. A basic structure to follow when selecting a balanced diet is 70% commercial marmoset diet, 20% 5 fresh fruits and vegetables, 5% high protein (eggs, yogurt, ect..), and 5% insects. A vitamin supplement can also be given.

CAPTIVE CARE - HANDLING

When obtained very young and with much attention, they become loving and tame pets. But even the most tame specimen HATES to be grabbed for any reason, and therefore they may not get along with small children. Even though they are small, a bite can still hurt miserably, and if threatened or grabbed they may retaliate with a painful bite. They can easily become stressed to their limits when being chased with the intent to be caught, so be calm and take your time.

The resource for this document is THE PRIMATE CARE HANDBOOK and can be ordered from the publisher, the Simian Society of America.

If you are wanting a marmoset for a pet it will need to be pulled off the mother at 2-4 weeks old and hand fed. This will ensure that the baby will rely on you for it's food and be tame. The infant will need to be fed low iron enfamil with a syringe about every 2-3 hours.

If you are wanting the marmoset for breeding purposes it should stay with the family so it can learn how to take care of it's young for at least 12-18 months then be paired up with another unrelated marmoset. The breeders should not be handled or tamed. This makes them rely on people and most of the time prevents them from taking care of their young.



Favorite Foods list:

Yogurt mixture(1 container plain non fat yogurt, 1 container flavored yogurt and ground monkey biscuits)


Fruits and vegetables
Mango
Oranges
Bananas
Melon
Grapes
Pinapple
Apples
Applesauce
Peaches
Pears
Raisins
Papaya

Vegetables:
Carrots
Green beans
Corn
Sweet potatoes
Cauliflower
Peas
Turnips

Protein:

Cheese
Boiled eggs
Boiled white meat chicken
Marmoset diet canned
Biscuits(they like them soaked in fruit juice)

Offer biscuits dry at all times in seperate feed bowl.




 




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